Fatal Discord Erasmus Luther And The Fight For The Western Mind Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Fatal Discord
Author: Michael Massing
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062870122
Pages: 1008
Year: 2018-02-27
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A deeply textured dual biography and fascinating intellectual history that examines two of the greatest minds of European history—Desiderius Erasmus and Martin Luther—whose heated rivalry gave rise to two enduring, fundamental, and often colliding traditions of philosophical and religious thought. Erasmus of Rotterdam was the leading figure of the Northern Renaissance. At a time when Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael were revolutionizing Western art and culture, Erasmus was helping to transform Europe’s intellectual and religious life, developing a new design for living for a continent rebelling against the hierarchical constraints of the Roman Church. When in 1516 he came out with a revised edition of the New Testament based on the original Greek, he was hailed as the prophet of a new enlightened age. Today, however, Erasmus is largely forgotten, and the reason can be summed up in two words: Martin Luther. As a young friar in remote Wittenberg, Luther was initially a great admirer of Erasmus and his critique of the Catholic Church, but while Erasmus sought to reform that institution from within, Luther wanted a more radical transformation. Eventually, the differences between them flared into a bitter rivalry, with each trying to win over Europe to his vision. In Fatal Discord, Michael Massing seeks to restore Erasmus to his proper place in the Western tradition. The conflict between him and Luther, he argues, forms a fault line in Western thinking—the moment when two enduring schools of thought, Christian humanism and evangelical Christianity, took shape. A seasoned journalist who has reported from many countries, Massing here travels back to the early sixteenth century to recover a long-neglected chapter of Western intellectual life, in which the introduction of new ways of reading the Bible set loose social and cultural forces that helped shatter the millennial unity of Christendom and whose echoes can still be heard today. Massing concludes that Europe has adopted a form of Erasmian humanism while America has been shaped by Luther-inspired individualism.
Fatal Discord
Author: Michael Massing
Publisher: Harper
ISBN: 0060517603
Pages: 960
Year: 2018-02-27
View: 409
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A deeply textured dual biography and fascinating intellectual history that examines two of the greatest minds of European history—Desiderius Erasmus and Martin Luther—whose heated rivalry gave rise to two enduring, fundamental, and often colliding traditions of philosophical and religious thought. Erasmus of Rotterdam was the leading figure of the Northern Renaissance. At a time when Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael were revolutionizing Western art and culture, Erasmus was helping to transform Europe’s intellectual and religious life, developing a new design for living for a continent rebelling against the hierarchical constraints of the Roman Church. When in 1516 he came out with a revised edition of the New Testament based on the original Greek, he was hailed as the prophet of a new enlightened age. Today, however, Erasmus is largely forgotten, and the reason can be summed up in two words: Martin Luther. As a young friar in remote Wittenberg, Luther was initially a great admirer of Erasmus and his critique of the Catholic Church, but while Erasmus sought to reform that institution from within, Luther wanted a more radical transformation. Eventually, the differences between them flared into a bitter rivalry, with each trying to win over Europe to his vision. In Fatal Discord, Michael Massing seeks to restore Erasmus to his proper place in the Western tradition. The conflict between him and Luther, he argues, forms a fault line in Western thinking—the moment when two enduring schools of thought, Christian humanism and evangelical Christianity, took shape. A seasoned journalist who has reported from many countries, Massing here travels back to the early sixteenth century to recover a long-neglected chapter of Western intellectual life, in which the introduction of new ways of reading the Bible set loose social and cultural forces that helped shatter the millennial unity of Christendom and whose echoes can still be heard today. Massing concludes that Europe has adopted a form of Erasmian humanism while America has been shaped by Luther-inspired individualism.
Erasmus of Rotterdam
Author: Christine Christ von-Wedel
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442665726
Pages: 384
Year: 2013-06-28
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This book provides the first analysis of the development of Erasmus’ historical methodology and its impact on Roman Catholic and Protestant theologians. Combining a biography of Erasmus with the larger theological debates and the intellectual history of his time, Christine Christ-von Wedel reveals many of previously unexplored influences on Erasmus, as well as his influences on his contemporaries. Erasmus of Rotterdam is a revised and considerably enlarged translation of Christ-von Wedel’s well-received 2003 study, originally published in German. Observing the influence of classical, biblical, patristic, scholastic, and late medieval vernacular and popular sources on Erasmus’ writing, the author provides comparisons with theologians Agrippa, Lefèvre d’Étaples, Eck, Luther, and Zwingli to demonstrate not only the singularity of Erasmus’ intellect, but also the enormous impact he had on the Reformation. The result is a lively picture of the man and his time, in which Erasmus emerges as both a devout Christian and a critical seeker of truth who conceded the ambiguities that he could not resolve.
Erasmus
Author: Cornelis Augustijn
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 0802071775
Pages: 239
Year: 1995
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Erasmus: His Life, Works, and Influence is a comprehensive introduction to Erasmus's life, works, and thoughts. It integrates the best scholarship of the past twenty years and will appeal to undergraduates in all areas of cultural history as well as Erasmus specialists.
Erasmus
Author: Leon E. Halkin
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 063119388X
Pages: 376
Year: 1994-08-15
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Erasmus was arguably the most outstanding intellectual figure of the sixteenth century. Through his numerous writings he took part in the great debates of the Renaissance: humanism, pacifism and religious reform. In this biography Leon Halkin meticulously reconstructs his life and demonstrates the enduring relevance of his writings today.
Erasmus and the Age of Reformation
Author: Johan Huizinga
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1608999505
Pages: 208
Year: 2010-10-01
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Desiderius Erasmus (ca. 1466 - 1536), the illegitimate child of a Rotterdam priest and a physician's daughter, grew up to become the greatest figure in the northern Renaissance and one of the most celebrated men in Europe--a scholar of such vast learning, sacred and secular, that both royalty and universities petitioned for his services. In this painstakingly researched and well-written biography, a noted scholar traces the life and works of Erasmus from the depths of monastic obscurity to his prominent role as one of the leading humanists of the day, and a central figure of the Reformation. We learn of Erasmus's childhood and early youth, his years as an itinerant scholar, his sojourns in France, England, Switzerland, and Italy, his close friendship with Sir Thomas More, and his theological disputations with Martin Luther. The author provides in-depth analysis of Erasmus' mind and character, and perceptive discussions of his writings, including the 1509 Lucianic satire In Praise of Folly (in the Latin, Encomin moriae, a punning allusion to More, with whom Erasmus was staying when he wrote it), which turned out to be one of his most popular and enduring works. Huizinga also discusses Erasmus' extremely influential (though controversial) translation of the New Testament from Greek into elegant Latin, which provided theologians with a much more accurate text than had previously been available. A thinker of timeless relevance, Erasmus, through his writings, exercised enormous influence on subsequent Western thought and culture. This edition of Johan Huizinga's classic biography is sure to appeal to students, scholars, and general readers.
Fear and Loathing in George W. Bush's Washington
Author: Elizabeth Drew
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 1590171284
Pages: 68
Year: 2004
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Many Democrats in the Senate are fearful of George W. Bush and "his unscrupulous political strategist, Karl Rove," writes Elizabeth Drew. The House, meanwhile, is run by Republican Whip Tom DeLay, "the mean-spirited partisan from Texas" who has polarized the chamber along party lines. How did we get to this point under a president who ran on a promise to unite rather than divide, and how has our government been affected? Elizabeth Drew's answers to these questions begin by exposing the cynicism of the Bush presidential campaign, orchestrated by Rove. She also reveals the deep division between the neocons in the Defense Department and the realists in the State Department. The controversy between the two camps, she finds, has "brought out bitterness and knife-wielding of a sort that Washington has seldom seen." The result, she concludes, is that "the increasing unwillingness to compromise is not only blocking legislation but, it is not overdramatic to say, is subverting fundamental concepts of democracy." Russell Baker in his preface writes: "In Washington an age of moral and philosophical sterility is deeply entrenched, and as Elizabeth Drew's reporting attests, the result is not pretty .... Since [the end of the cold war] government has seemed to be mostly about raising money to get elected, and then reelected repeatedly in order to service those who put up the money. There is no moral urgency in it, no philosophical imperative at work."
Erasmus, Man of Letters
Author: Lisa Jardine
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400866170
Pages: 304
Year: 2015-06-23
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The name Erasmus of Rotterdam conjures up a golden age of scholarly integrity and the disinterested pursuit of knowledge, when learning could command public admiration without the need for authorial self-promotion. Lisa Jardine, however, shows that Erasmus self-consciously created his own reputation as the central figure of the European intellectual world. Erasmus himself—the historical as opposed to the figural individual—was a brilliant, maverick innovator, who achieved little formal academic recognition in his own lifetime. What Jardine offers here is not only a fascinating study of Erasmus but also a bold account of a key moment in Western history, a time when it first became possible to believe in the existence of something that could be designated "European thought."
Queen of the Sea
Author: Barry Hatton
Publisher: Hurst & Company
ISBN: 1849049971
Pages: 256
Year: 2018-07-12
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Lisbon was almost somewhere else. Portuguese officials considered moving the city after it was devastated by what is believed to be the strongest earthquake ever to strike modern Europe, in 1755, followed by a tidal wave as high as a double-decker bus and a six-day inferno that turned sandinto glass. Lisbon's charm is legendary, but its rich, 2,000-year history is not widely known. This single-volume history provides an unrivalled and intimate portrait of the city and an entertaining account of its colorful past. It reveals that in Roman times the city was more important than initially thought, possessing a large theatre and hippodrome. The 1147 Siege of Lisbon was a dramaticmedieval battle that was a key part of the Iberian reconquista. As Portugal built an empire spanning four continents, its capital became a wealthy international bazaar. The Portuguese king's cortege was led by a rhinoceros which was followed by five elephants in gold brocade, an Arabian horse and ajaguar. The Portuguese were the world's biggest slavers, and by the mid-16th century around 10 percent of the Lisbon's population was black, imbuing the city with an African flavor it has retained. Invasion by Napoleon's armies, and the assassination of a king and the establishment of a republic,also left their marks. The city's two bridges over the River Tagus illustrate the legacy of a 20th-century dictator and Portugal's new era in Europe.
Victorious Century
Author: David Cannadine
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 052555789X
Pages: 624
Year: 2018-02-20
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Originally published in Great Britain in 2017 by Allen Lane.
The Darkening Age
Author: Catherine Nixey
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0544800931
Pages: 384
Year: 2018-04-17
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A bold new history of the rise of Christianity, showing how its radical followers ravaged vast swathes of classical culture, plunging the world into an era of dogma and intellectual darkness “Searingly passionate…Nixey writes up a storm. Each sentence is rich, textured, evocative, felt…[A] ballista-bolt of a book.” —New York Times Book Review In Harran, the locals refused to convert. They were dismembered, their limbs hung along the town’s main street. In Alexandria, zealots pulled the elderly philosopher-mathematician Hypatia from her chariot and flayed her to death with shards of broken pottery. Not long before, their fellow Christians had invaded the city’s greatest temple and razed it—smashing its world-famous statues and destroying all that was left of Alexandria’s Great Library. Today, we refer to Christianity’s conquest of the West as a “triumph.” But this victory entailed an orgy of destruction in which Jesus’s followers attacked and suppressed classical culture, helping to pitch Western civilization into a thousand-year-long decline. Just one percent of Latin literature would survive the purge; countless antiquities, artworks, and ancient traditions were lost forever. As Catherine Nixey reveals, evidence of early Christians’ campaign of terror has been hiding in plain sight: in the palimpsests and shattered statues proudly displayed in churches and museums the world over. In The Darkening Age, Nixey resurrects this lost history, offering a wrenching account of the rise of Christianity and its terrible cost.
The Erasmus Reader
Author: Erika Rummel
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442659238
Pages: 376
Year: 1990-12-15
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'A judicious and discerning selection of large extracts from the Collected Works of Erasmus /EM... thoughtfully designed to include major statements of Erasmus on civility in individual morals, humanistic study and education, the Christian life, reform of the church, and the peaceful constraint of political force. It is to my mind the most comprehensive and penetrating anthology of Erasmus' writing, forcefully revealing his central values.' – Charles Trinkaus, Emeritus Professor of History, University of Michigan 'Rummel's collection makes available readable translations of Erasmus' most original and influential works – the books that made him the intellectual conscience of his generation of scholars and the inspiration of many Reformers who took positions he did not accept. They reveal the biblical scholar, the humanist and literary theorist, and the social critic that Erasmus was, far more fully and vividly than any previous anthology.' – Anthony Grafton, Program in History of Science, Princeton University 'The high quality of the Toronto edition of the Collected Works of Erasmus has earned it a central place in the libraries of scholars around the world. The Erasmus Reader extends this impact to the carrels and desks of beginning and advanced students of Renaissance and Reformation history.' – Heiko A. Oberman, Director, Division for Late Medieval and Reformation Studies, University of Arizona
The Great Rift
Author: Michael E. Hobart
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674985168
Pages: 520
Year: 2018-04-16
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In their search for truth, contemporary religious believers and modern scientific investigators hold many values in common. But in their approaches, they express two fundamentally different conceptions of how to understand and represent the world. Michael E. Hobart looks for the origin of this difference in the work of Renaissance thinkers who invented a revolutionary mathematical system—relational numeracy. By creating meaning through numbers and abstract symbols rather than words, relational numeracy allowed inquisitive minds to vault beyond the constraints of language and explore the natural world with a fresh interpretive vision. The Great Rift is the first book to examine the religion-science divide through the history of information technology. Hobart follows numeracy as it emerged from the practical counting systems of merchants, the abstract notations of musicians, the linear perspective of artists, and the calendars and clocks of astronomers. As the technology of the alphabet and of mere counting gave way to abstract symbols, the earlier “thing-mathematics” metamorphosed into the relational mathematics of modern scientific investigation. Using these new information symbols, Galileo and his contemporaries mathematized motion and matter, separating the demonstrations of science from the linguistic logic of religious narration. Hobart locates the great rift between science and religion not in ideological disagreement but in advances in mathematics and symbolic representation that opened new windows onto nature. In so doing, he connects the cognitive breakthroughs of the past with intellectual debates ongoing in the twenty-first century.
Erasmus and Luther: The Battle Over Free Will
Author: Clarence H. Miller, Peter Macardle
Publisher: Hackett Publishing
ISBN: 1603848231
Pages: 416
Year: 2012-03-09
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This compilation of writings from Erasmus and Luther's great debate -- over free will and grace, and their respective efficacy for salvation -- offers a fuller representation of the disputants' main arguments than has ever been available in a single volume in English. Included are key, corresponding selections from not only Erasmus' conciliatory A Discussion or Discourse concerning Free Will and Luther's forceful and fully argued rebuttal, but -- with the battle now joined -- from Erasmus' own forceful and fully argued rebuttal of Luther. Students of Reformation theology, Christian humanism, and sixteenth-century rhetoric will find here the key to a wider appreciation of one of early modern Christianitys most illuminating and disputed controversies.
Against War
Author: Desiderius Erasmus
Publisher: The Floating Press
ISBN: 1775457621
Pages: 65
Year: 2012-04-01
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Dutch thinker and theologian Desiderius Erasmus played a key role in the development of humanism during the Renaissance and early modern periods. In Against War, Erasmus mounts a stunningly lucid and detailed argument against armed combat on humanistic grounds. It's a must-read for anyone who has strong feelings about the moral and ethical dimensions of militaristic undertakings.