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The Utopian Vision of H.G. Wells
Author: Justin E.A. Busch
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786455497
Pages: 212
Year: 2009-10-20
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This book examines and develops the evolutionary utopian ideas of H.G. Wells. It begins with a detailed consideration of the types of individuals who could create and live in ideal societies, as well as the social, aesthetic and intellectual aspects of utopian life in Wells's books. It then discusses the role of the state and how Wells's utopian thought requires a permanent commitment to expanding freedom. The final chapter covers death and how utopian thought can profoundly reshape the reader's understanding of his or her own position relative to current and future societies.
A Modern Utopia
Author: H G Wells
Publisher: ePenguin
ISBN:
Pages: 281
Year: 1904
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While walking in the Swiss Alps, two English travellers fall into a space-warp, and suddenly find themselves in another world. In many ways the same as our own - even down to the characters that inhabit it - this new planet is still somehow radically different, for the two walkers are now upon a Utopian Earth controlled by a single World Government. Here, as they soon learn, all share a common language, there is sexual, economic and racial equality, and society is ruled by socialist ideals enforced by an austere, voluntary elite: the 'Samurai'. But what will the Utopians make of these new visitors from a less perfect world?
The Time Machine
Author: H. G. Wells
Publisher:
ISBN: 1514650142
Pages: 56
Year: 2015-06-22
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The Time Machine is a science fiction novel by H. G. Wells, published in 1895. Wells is generally credited with the popularization of the concept of time travel by using a vehicle that allows an operator to travel purposefully and selectively. The term "time machine", coined by Wells, is now almost universally used to refer to such a vehicle.The Time Machine has since been adapted into two feature films of the same name, as well as two television versions, and a large number of comic book adaptations. It has also indirectly inspired many more works of fiction in many media.
H.G. Wells on Film
Author: Don G. Smith
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 1476611165
Pages: 205
Year: 2002-07-15
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One of the most influential thinkers of his era, H.G. Wells is primarily known for his science fiction writings that looked ahead in time to teach and warn. These novels and stories inspired many filmmakers to bring his visions (if often greatly altered or misfocused) to life on screen. He himself wrote screenplays and closely supervised the production of some of his work. This book is a study of every theatrically released film from 1909 to 1997 that is based, even loosely, on the writings of H.G. Wells, including The Time Machine, The Island of Dr. Moreau, The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds, The First Men in the Moon, The Food of the Gods and The Empire of the Ants, to name a few. For each film, the author discusses the circumstances surrounding its creation, its plot, how it compares with the literary work, its production and marketing, and its strengths and weaknesses based on aesthetic qualities.
The Shape of Things to Come
Author: H.G. Wells
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141921218
Pages: 576
Year: 2005-05-26
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When Dr Philip Raven, an intellectual working for the League of Nations, dies in 1930 he leaves behind a powerful legacy - an unpublished 'dream book'. Inspired by visions he has experienced for many years, it appears to be a book written far into the future: a history of humanity from the date of his death up to 2105. The Shape of Things to Come provides this 'history of the future', an account that was in some ways remarkably prescient - predicting climatic disaster and sweeping cultural changes, including a Second World War, the rise of chemical warfare, and political instabilities in the Middle East.
Utopias and Dystopias in the Fiction of H. G. Wells and William Morris
Author: Emelyne Godfrey
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137523409
Pages: 282
Year: 2016-12-08
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This book is about the fiercely contrasting visions of two of the nineteenth century’s greatest utopian writers. A wide-ranging, interdisciplinary study, it emphasizes that space is a key factor in utopian fiction, often a barometer of mankind’s successful relationship with nature, or an indicator of danger. Emerging and critically acclaimed scholars consider the legacy of two great utopian writers, exploring their use of space and time in the creation of sites in which contemporary social concerns are investigated and reordered. A variety of locations is featured, including Morris’s quasi-fourteenth century London, the lush and corrupted island, a routed and massacred English countryside, the high-rises of the future and the vertiginous landscape of another Earth beyond the stars.
The World Set Free
Author: H. G. Wells
Publisher: Fantastica via PublishDrive
ISBN: 1787241882
Pages: 182
Year: 2017-02-22
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The history of mankind is the history of the attainment of external power. Man is the tool-using, fire-making animal. From the outset of his terrestrial career we find him supplementing the natural strength and bodily weapons of a beast by the heat of burning and the rough implement of stone. So he passed beyond the ape. From that he expands.
H.G. Wells Under Revision
Author: Patrick Parrinder, Christopher Rolfe
Publisher: Associated University Presse
ISBN: 0945636059
Pages: 263
Year: 1990
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Dissatisfied with her relationship with her boyfriend, Constance Wechselburger, a graduate film student, embarks on a disheartening, confusing quest in search of her vision of the ideal intellectual mate.
Quicklet on H.G. Wells' The Time Machine
Author: Jean Asta
Publisher: Hyperink Inc
ISBN: 1614648859
Pages: 22
Year: 2012-02-29
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ABOUT THE BOOK I was never a fan of the original Doctor Who series—maybe because I was too young to really appreciate it. But when the BBC revived the series in 2005, I became hooked, and fell in love with both Christopher Eccleston and David Tennant. In Season 3 of the series, the TARDIS flees to the end of time, a trillion years in the future. There, the Doctor and his companions, Martha and Jack, discover the fate of the human race; they have divided into the humans and the "future kind," who feed on the humans. The humans flee the planet where they are living, in search of Utopia—which only leads to a horrible, heartbreaking end for humanity. Somewhere in the back of my mind, a tiny bell began to ring... The episode was a tribute of sorts to H.G. Wells' The Time Machine. And in fact, Doctor Who and all other science fiction stories or series owe their origins to H.G. Well. As the author of The Time Machine, The Invisible Man, War of the Worlds, and The Island of Doctor Moreau, Wells wrote fantastical visions of future societies that he intended as warnings to what we might become. Wells is now thought of as the father of science fiction, and whether you prefer Doctor Who, The Terminator, or Aliens, all science fiction fans will enjoy reading the works of the man whose imagination started it all. MEET THE AUTHOR Jean Asta is the owner of Asta Communications, a freelance communications company providing writing, editing, and training services for clients around the globe. She has a BA in English Literature and a Master's in Public Administration, both from the University of Georgia. EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK He learns about the Morlocks, another race of humans who prey on the Eloi, and realizes that they must have his time machine. He follows one of their tunnels into the earth, barely escaping when they try to capture him. He and Weena go to the green palace, where he gets supplies and metal that he can fashion into a weapon to use against the Morlocks. He lights a fire, and he and Weena lie down to rest. He oversleeps, waking up to find he is under attack from the Morlocks and Weena is gone. As he fights the Morlocks, he realizes his fire has spread, engulfing the forest. He escapes the Morlocks and the fire, but Weena is lost. He is determined to get his time machine back, so he heads to the Sphinx, a giant idol that the Morlocks seem to worship. He enters the base and finds his machine, but realizes it was a trap set by the Morlocks. He barely manages to escape and, in his haste, accidentally sets the machine further into the future... Buy a copy to keep reading!
The Open Conspiracy
Author: H. G. Wells
Publisher: Read Books Ltd
ISBN: 1473394155
Pages: 129
Year: 2017-02-16
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This volume contains H. G. Wells's 1928 work, "The Open Conspiracy: Blue Prints for a World Revolution". Wells describes the book as a “scheme to thrust forward and establish a human control over the destinies of life and liberate it from its present dangers, uncertainties and miseries." The text suggests that, thanks to scientific advancement, a world "politically, socially and economically unified" is being established by educated and influential people which could be the foundation of "a world revolution aiming at universal peace.” This fascinating and thought-provoking treatise will appeal to those with an interest in utopian literature, and it is not to be missed by fans and collectors of Wells’s work. Herbert George Wells (1866 - 1946) was a seminal English writer whose notable works include "The War of the Worlds" (1897) and "The Time Machine" (1895). Many vintage texts such as this are increasingly scarce and expensive, and it is with this in mind that we are republishing this book now, in an affordable, high-quality, modern edition. It comes complete with a specially commissioned biography of the author.
World Brain
Author: H. G. Wells
Publisher: Read Books Ltd
ISBN: 1473345758
Pages: 145
Year: 2016-09-13
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“World Brain” is an article written by H. G. Wells and first contributed to the new “Encyclopédie Française” in 1937. It explores the idea of a “permanent world encyclopaedia” that would contain “the whole human memory” and that would be “a world synthesis of bibliography and documentation with the indexed archives of the world.” Fascinating and arguably prophetic reading, “World Brain” will appeal to fan Wells' work. Herbert George Wells (1866 – 1946) was a prolific English writer who wrote in a variety of genres, including the novel, politics, history, and social commentary. Today, he is perhaps best remembered for his contributions to the science fiction genre thanks to such novels as “The Time Machine” (1895), “The Invisible Man” (1897), and “The War of the Worlds” (1898). "The Father of Science Fiction" was also a staunch socialist, and his later works are increasingly political and didactic. Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this book now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially commissioned new biography of the author.
Modern Utopian Fictions from H.G. Wells to Iris Murdoch
Author: Peter Edgerly Firchow
Publisher: CUA Press
ISBN: 0813215730
Pages: 203
Year: 2008
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Criticism on utopian subjects has generally neglected the literary or fictional dimension of utopia. The reason for such neglect may be that earlier utopian fictions tended to be written by what one would nowadays call social scientists, e.g., Plato or Sir Thomas More. That is also why earlier discussions of utopian fiction were usually written by critics trained in the social sciences rather than by critics trained in literature. To an appreciable degree this still tends to be the case today. Now, however, there is an additional difficulty, for the social scientists are critiquing utopias written by people who are primarily literary, for example, Krishan Kumar on Wells or Bernard Crick on Orwell. Inevitably much of importance--of literary importance--is simply disregarded, and so our understanding of modern utopia is correspondingly diminished. This book aims to put the fiction back into utopian fictions. While tracing the development of fiction in the writing of modern utopias, especially in Britain, it seeks to demonstrate in specific ways how those utopias have become increasingly literary--possibly as a reaction not only against the "social scientification" of modern utopias but also in reaction against the modern attempt to institute "utopia" in reality, notably in the former Soviet Union but also in consumerist, late-twentieth-century America. After an introductory discussion of how we understand--and how we should understand--modern utopian fictions, the book provides several examples of how those understandings affect our appreciation of utopian fiction. There are chapters on H. G. Wells's Time Machine; Bernard Shaw's Major Barbara; Aldous Huxley's Brave New World; George Orwell's Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four; William Golding's Lord of the Flies; and Iris Murdoch's The Bell. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Peter Edgerly Firchow, internationally recognized scholar and author of numerous works including Reluctant Modernists, W. H. Auden: Contexts for Poetry, Envisioning Africa: Racism and Imperialism in Conrad's "Heart of Darkness," and The End of Utopia, is professor of English at the University of Minnesota. "Firchow includes much that is praiseworthy in this short book on utopian fiction. . . . Firchow's work displays his very well informed explication and his ability, in most instances, to make literary texts come alive. His treatment of Wells's The Time Machine is simply outstanding. . . . I find his enthusiasm for his texts refreshing and his work on the end of history meticulous. Other scholars of utopian fiction will as well." -- H-Net Reviews "Utopian fiction has often been mangled in interpretation on the occasions when it has been read without a sense of irony, for the sake of political analysis, disregarding its artistic nature. To counterpoise such approaches, Firchow offers us a close reading of each of the chosen works, while also placing them in literary context," -- Janice Rossen, Partial Answers
Star Begotten
Author: H.G. Wells, John Huntington
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
ISBN: 0819567299
Pages: 156
Year: 1937
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H.G. Wells’s second Martian invasion comes from within.
In the Days of the Comet
Author: H. G. Wells
Publisher: Read Books Ltd
ISBN: 1473345049
Pages: 284
Year: 2016-09-13
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This is H. G. Wells' 1906 science fiction novel, “In the Days of the Comet”. The strange vapours of a nearby comet begin to alter the air of Earth itself, engendering an incredible, long-lasting transformation in the way people think. An entertaining and thought-provoking novel, “In the Days of the Comet” represents the classic sci-fi that Wells is famous for, and it is not to be missed by fans and collectors of his seminal work. Herbert George Wells (1866 – 1946) was a prolific English writer who wrote in a variety of genres, including the novel, politics, history, and social commentary. Today, he is perhaps best remembered for his contributions to the science fiction genre thanks to such novels as “The Time Machine” (1895), “The Invisible Man” (1897), and “The War of the Worlds” (1898). Although never a winner, Wells was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature a total of four times. Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this book now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially commissioned new biography of the author. First published in 1906.
The New Machiavelli
Author: H. G. Wells
Publisher: Read Books Ltd
ISBN: 1473345405
Pages: 444
Year: 2016-09-13
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“The New Machiavelli” is a novel written by H. G. Wells, first published in 1911. The plot was well-known to have been based on Wells' affair with Amber Reeves and a satire of Beatrice and Sidney web; and, as such, was constituted a veritable literary scandal at the time. An interesting and entertaining story of life and loves, “The New Machiavelli” will not disappoint fans of Wells work and deserves a place on every bookshelf. Contents include: “The Making Of A Man”, “Concerning A Book That Was Never Written”, “Bromstead And My Father”, “Margaret In London”, et cetera. Herbert George Wells (1866 – 1946) was a prolific English writer who wrote in a variety of genres, including the novel, politics, history, and social commentary. Today, he is perhaps best remembered for his contributions to the science fiction genre thanks to such novels as “The Time Machine” (1895), “The Invisible Man” (1897), and “The War of the Worlds” (1898). Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this book now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially commissioned new biography of the author.