Yo Contengo Multitudes Los Microbios Que Nos Habitan Y Una Mayor Vision De La Vida Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Yo contengo multitudes
Author: Ed Yong
Publisher: DEBATE
ISBN: 8499928064
Pages: 432
Year: 2017-09-14
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Yo contengo multitudes ya es considerado una obra fundamental de ciencia divulgativa -como lo fue en su momento El gen egoísta-. Un libro fascinante y rompedor que cambiará de mil millones de micromaneras nuestra percepción del mundo natural y el espacio que en él ocupamos. El cuerpo humano alberga billones de microbios que conforman todo un mundo en simbiosis con su entorno. Estos microscópicos y multitudinarios compañeros vitales no solo moldean nuestros órganos, nos protegen de enfermedades, e influyen en nuestro comportamiento, sino que resultan clave a la hora de entender el funcionamiento de la vida. En Yo contengo multitudes Ed Yong nos abre los ojos y nos invita con su erudición y sentido del humor a mirarnos como algo más que individuos: como receptáculos interdependientes de los microbiomas que conforman todos los seres vivos. Así, descubriremos la asombrosa e invisible ciencia detrás de los gigantescos arrecifes que construyen los corales, aprenderemos cómo ciertos calamares crean juegos de luces, y veremos el modo en que las bacterias pueden alterar nuestra respuesta en la lucha contra el cáncer, manipular nuestro sistema inmunológico, influir en nuestra evolución e incluso modificar nuestro genoma. Bill Gates opina sobre este libro... «Después de leer el interesantísimo libro Yo contengo multitudes del periodista británico Ed Yong, veo los microbios con una mirada diferente y hablo de ellos con nuevos términos. [...] Yong sintetiza literalmente cientos y cientos de páginas, sin abrumarte nunca con la ciencia. Tan solo imparte una visión fascinante y sorprendente detrás de otra. Yo contengo multitudes es el mejor periodismo científico.» The Blog of Bill Gates
I Contain Multitudes
Author: Ed Yong
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062368621
Pages: 368
Year: 2016-08-09
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Joining the ranks of popular science classics like The Botany of Desire and The Selfish Gene, a groundbreaking, wondrously informative, and vastly entertaining examination of the most significant revolution in biology since Darwin—a “microbe’s-eye view” of the world that reveals a marvelous, radically reconceived picture of life on earth. Every animal, whether human, squid, or wasp, is home to millions of bacteria and other microbes. Ed Yong, whose humor is as evident as his erudition, prompts us to look at ourselves and our animal companions in a new light—less as individuals and more as the interconnected, interdependent multitudes we assuredly are. The microbes in our bodies are part of our immune systems and protect us from disease. In the deep oceans, mysterious creatures without mouths or guts depend on microbes for all their energy. Bacteria provide squid with invisibility cloaks, help beetles to bring down forests, and allow worms to cause diseases that afflict millions of people. Many people think of microbes as germs to be eradicated, but those that live with us—the microbiome—build our bodies, protect our health, shape our identities, and grant us incredible abilities. In this astonishing book, Ed Yong takes us on a grand tour through our microbial partners, and introduces us to the scientists on the front lines of discovery. It will change both our view of nature and our sense of where we belong in it.
Utopia for Realists
Author: Rutger Bregman
Publisher: Little, Brown
ISBN: 0316471909
Pages: 336
Year: 2017-03-14
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Universal basic income. A 15-hour workweek. Open borders. Does it sound too good to be true? One of Europe's leading young thinkers shows how we can build an ideal world today. After working all day at jobs we often dislike, we buy things we don't need. Rutger Bregman, a Dutch historian, reminds us it needn't be this way-and in some places it isn't. Rutger Bregman's TED Talk about universal basic income seemed impossibly radical when he delivered it in 2014. His April 2017 talk continues to make the provocative case, detailing the idea's 500-year history and even its brief success in a forgotten trial in Manitoba in the 1970s. Nearly a million views later, guaranteed basic income is being seriously considered by leading economists and government leaders the world over. It's just one of the many utopian ideas that Bregman proves is possible today. Utopia for Realists is one of those rare books that takes you by surprise and challenges what you think can happen. From a Canadian city that once completely eradicated poverty, to Richard Nixon's near implementation of a basic income for millions of Americans, Bregman takes us on a journey through history, and beyond the traditional left-right divides, as he champions ideas whose time have come. Every progressive milestone of civilization-from the end of slavery to the beginning of democracy-was once considered a utopian fantasy. Bregman's book, both challenging and bracing, demonstrates that new utopian ideas, like the elimination of poverty and the creation of the fifteen-hour workweek, can become a reality in our lifetime. Being unrealistic and unreasonable can in fact make the impossible inevitable, and it is the only way to build the ideal world.
Touching a Nerve: Our Brains, Our Selves
Author: Patricia S. Churchland
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393240630
Pages: 256
Year: 2013-07-22
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A trailblazing philosopher’s exploration of the latest brain science—and its ethical and practical implications. What happens when we accept that everything we feel and think stems not from an immaterial spirit but from electrical and chemical activity in our brains? In this thought-provoking narrative—drawn from professional expertise as well as personal life experiences—trailblazing neurophilosopher Patricia S. Churchland grounds the philosophy of mind in the essential ingredients of biology. She reflects with humor on how she came to harmonize science and philosophy, the mind and the brain, abstract ideals and daily life. Offering lucid explanations of the neural workings that underlie identity, she reveals how the latest research into consciousness, memory, and free will can help us reexamine enduring philosophical, ethical, and spiritual questions: What shapes our personalities? How do we account for near-death experiences? How do we make decisions? And why do we feel empathy for others? Recent scientific discoveries also provide insights into a fascinating range of real-world dilemmas—for example, whether an adolescent can be held responsible for his actions and whether a patient in a coma can be considered a self. Churchland appreciates that the brain-based understanding of the mind can unnerve even our greatest thinkers. At a conference she attended, a prominent philosopher cried out, “I hate the brain; I hate the brain!” But as Churchland shows, he need not feel this way. Accepting that our brains are the basis of who we are liberates us from the shackles of superstition. It allows us to take ourselves seriously as a product of evolved mechanisms, past experiences, and social influences. And it gives us hope that we can fix some grievous conditions, and when we cannot, we can at least understand them with compassion.
Biology For Dummies
Author: Rene Fester Kratz, Donna Rae Siegfried
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470768363
Pages: 384
Year: 2010-05-18
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An updated edition of the ultimate guide to understanding biology Ever wondered how the food you eat becomes the energy your body needs to keep going? The theory of evolution says that humans and chimps descended from a common ancestor, but does it tell us how and why? We humans are insatiably curious creatures who can't help wondering how things work — starting with our own bodies. Wouldn't it be great to have a single source of quick answers to all our questions about how living things work? Now there is. From molecules to animals, cells to ecosystems, Biology For Dummies, 2nd Edition answers all your questions about how living things work. Written in plain English and packed with dozens of illustrations, quick-reference Cheat Sheets, and helpful tables and diagrams, it cuts right to the chase with fast-paced, easy-to-absorb explanations of the life processes common to all organisms. More than 20% new and updated content, including a substantial overhaul to the organization of topics to make it a friendly classroom supplement Coverage of the most recent developments and discoveries in evolutionary, reproductive, and ecological biology Includes practical, up-to-date examples Whether you're currently enrolled in a biology class or just want to know more about this fascinating and ever-evolving field of study, this engaging guide will give you a grip on complex biology concepts and unlock the mysteries of how life works in no time.
Deposed
Author: David Barbaree
Publisher: Bonnier Publishing Fiction Ltd.
ISBN: 1785762680
Pages: 480
Year: 2017-05-04
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'Outstanding. An extraordinary recreation of ancient Rome. Miss this at your peril' Ben Kane More gripping than Game of Thrones and more ruthless than House of Cards - this a stunning new thriller of power, treachery and revenge In a darkened cell, a brutally deposed dictator lies crippled - deprived of his power, his freedom - and his eyes. On the edge of utter despair, his only companion is the young boy who brings him his meagre rations, a mere child who fears his own shadow. But to one who has held and lost the highest power, one thing alone is crystal clear: even emperors were mere children once. Ten years later, the new ruler's son watches uneasily over his father's empire. Wherever he looks rebellion is festering, and those closest to him have turned traitor once before. To this city in crisis comes a hugely wealthy senator from the very edge of the empire, a young and angry ward at his heels. He is witty but inscrutable, generous with his time and money to a leader in desperate need of a friend - and he wears a bandage over his blinded eyes. The fallen emperor's name is Nero. But this isn't his story. 'This marvellous debut moves backwards and forwards in time to tell the story of Nero's possible and astonishing tale' Sunday Express 'Barbaree has delivered an extraordinary first novel, impressing with its complex plotting, powerful imagination, strong and authentic characters, and the author's gift for making fiction seem so palpably real. Politics, scheming, corruption, barbarity and betrayal... the best bits of Roman history but with an original new twist!' Lancashire Evening Post 'A blinder! 5 stars' Weekend Sport
Relic
Author: Tom Egeland
Publisher: John Murray
ISBN: 1848543921
Pages: 300
Year: 2010-10-14
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A thriller packed full of mythical intrigue, about a ground-breaking biblical secret. A golden relic, containing an ancient manuscript that could change the course of history, has been hidden in a monastery. But nobody knows where. One determined man sets out to find this sensational artefact and to trace its origins. His quest takes him via a scientific intelligence organization in London, a Middle Eastern outpost and a Crusaders' castle, as layer by layer he reveals the religous mysteries inside the Shrine of Sacred Secrets.
The Seven Madmen
Author: Roberto Arlt
Publisher: Serpent's Tail
ISBN: 1782831487
Pages:
Year: 2015-02-19
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Remo Erdosain's Buenos Aires is a dim, seething, paranoid hive of hustlers and whores, scoundrels and madmen, and Erdosain feels his soul is as polluted as anything in this dingy city. Possessed by the directionlessness of the society around him, trapped between spiritual anguish and madness, he clings to anything that can give his life meaning: small-time defrauding of his employers, hatred of his wife's cousin Gregorio Barsut, a part in the Astrologer's plans for a new world order... but is that enough? Or is the only appropriate response to reality - insanity? Written in 1929, The Seven Madmen depicts an Argentina on the edge of the precipice. This teeming world of dreamers, revolutionaries and scheming generals was Arlt's uncanny prophesy of the cycle of conflict which would scar his country's passage through the twentieth century, and even today it retains its power as one of the great apocalyptic works of modern literature.
Animal Wise
Author: Virginia Morell
Publisher: Crown Pub
ISBN: 0307461440
Pages: 291
Year: 2013
View: 501
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Looks at the interactions that have occurred between scientists and animal subjects and explains what is being discovered about how and what animals think and feel and the ethical questions that these new findings are raising.
The White House and the Blue House
Author: Yong Hyo Cho, H. George Frederickson
Publisher: Univ Pr of Amer
ISBN:
Pages: 342
Year: 1997-11-28
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Spontaneous Evolution
Author: Bruce H. Lipton
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 1458755622
Pages: 732
Year: 2010-08-16
View: 415
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We've all heard stories of people who've experienced seemingly miraculous recoveries from illness, but can the same thing happen for our world? According to pioneering biologist Bruce H. Lipton, it's not only possible, it's already occurring. In Spontaneous Evolution, this world-renowned expert in the emerging science of epigenetics reveals how our changing understanding of biology will help us navigate this turbulent period in our planet's history and how each of us can participate in this global shift. In collaboration with political philosopher Steve Bhaerman, Dr. Lipton invites readers to reconsider: the ''unquestionable'' pillars of biology, including random evolution, survival of the fittest, and the role of DNA; the relationship between mind and matter; how our beliefs about nature and human nature shape our politics, culture, and individual lives; and how each of us can become planetary ''stem cells'' supporting the health and growth of our world. By questioning the old beliefs that got us to where we are today and keep us stuck in the status quo, we can trigger the spontaneous evolution of our species that will usher in a brighter future.
Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection
Author: Peter Godfrey-Smith
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191609552
Pages: 218
Year: 2009-03-26
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In 1859 Darwin described a deceptively simple mechanism that he called "natural selection," a combination of variation, inheritance, and reproductive success. He argued that this mechanism was the key to explaining the most puzzling features of the natural world, and science and philosophy were changed forever as a result. The exact nature of the Darwinian process has been controversial ever since, however. Godfrey-Smith draws on new developments in biology, philosophy of science, and other fields to give a new analysis and extension of Darwin's idea. The central concept used is that of a "Darwinian population," a collection of things with the capacity to undergo change by natural selection. From this starting point, new analyses of the role of genes in evolution, the application of Darwinian ideas to cultural change, and "evolutionary transitions" that produce complex organisms and societies are developed. Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection will be essential reading for anyone interested in evolutionary theory

DNA

DNA
Author: James D. Watson, Andrew Berry
Publisher: Knopf
ISBN: 0307521486
Pages: 464
Year: 2009-01-21
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Fifty years ago, James D. Watson, then just twentyfour, helped launch the greatest ongoing scientific quest of our time. Now, with unique authority and sweeping vision, he gives us the first full account of the genetic revolution—from Mendel’s garden to the double helix to the sequencing of the human genome and beyond. Watson’s lively, panoramic narrative begins with the fanciful speculations of the ancients as to why “like begets like” before skipping ahead to 1866, when an Austrian monk named Gregor Mendel first deduced the basic laws of inheritance. But genetics as we recognize it today—with its capacity, both thrilling and sobering, to manipulate the very essence of living things—came into being only with the rise of molecular investigations culminating in the breakthrough discovery of the structure of DNA, for which Watson shared a Nobel prize in 1962. In the DNA molecule’s graceful curves was the key to a whole new science. Having shown that the secret of life is chemical, modern genetics has set mankind off on a journey unimaginable just a few decades ago. Watson provides the general reader with clear explanations of molecular processes and emerging technologies. He shows us how DNA continues to alter our understanding of human origins, and of our identities as groups and as individuals. And with the insight of one who has remained close to every advance in research since the double helix, he reveals how genetics has unleashed a wealth of possibilities to alter the human condition—from genetically modified foods to genetically modified babies—and transformed itself from a domain of pure research into one of big business as well. It is a sometimes topsy-turvy world full of great minds and great egos, driven by ambitions to improve the human condition as well as to improve investment portfolios, a world vividly captured in these pages. Facing a future of choices and social and ethical implications of which we dare not remain uninformed, we could have no better guide than James Watson, who leads us with the same bravura storytelling that made The Double Helix one of the most successful books on science ever published. Infused with a scientist’s awe at nature’s marvels and a humanist’s profound sympathies, DNA is destined to become the classic telling of the defining scientific saga of our age.
The Butchering Art
Author: Lindsey Fitzharris
Publisher: Scientific American / Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 0374117292
Pages: 304
Year: 2017-10-17
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"Warning: She spares no detail!" —Erik Larson, bestselling author of Dead Wake A Top 10 Science Book of Fall 2017, Publishers Weekly "Fascinating and shocking." —Kirkus Reviews (starred review) The gripping story of how Joseph Lister’s antiseptic method changed medicine forever In The Butchering Art, the historian Lindsey Fitzharris reveals the shocking world of nineteenth-century surgery on the eve of profound transformation. She conjures up early operating theaters—no place for the squeamish—and surgeons, working before anesthesia, who were lauded for their speed and brute strength. These medical pioneers knew that the aftermath of surgery was often more dangerous than their patients’ afflictions, and they were baffled by the persistent infections that kept mortality rates stubbornly high. At a time when surgery couldn’t have been more hazardous, an unlikely figure stepped forward: a young, melancholy Quaker surgeon named Joseph Lister, who would solve the deadly riddle and change the course of history. Fitzharris dramatically recounts Lister’s discoveries in gripping detail, culminating in his audacious claim that germs were the source of all infection—and could be countered by antiseptics. Focusing on the tumultuous period from 1850 to 1875, she introduces us to Lister and his contemporaries—some of them brilliant, some outright criminal—and takes us through the grimy medical schools and dreary hospitals where they learned their art, the deadhouses where they studied anatomy, and the graveyards they occasionally ransacked for cadavers. Eerie and illuminating, The Butchering Art celebrates the triumph of a visionary surgeon whose quest to unite science and medicine delivered us into the modern world.
Sever
Author: Lauren DeStefano
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1442409134
Pages: 384
Year: 2013-02-12
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Time is running out for Rhine in the conclusion to the New York Times bestselling Chemical Garden Trilogy. With time ticking until the virus takes its toll, Rhine is desperate for answers. After enduring Vaughn’s worst, Rhine finds an unlikely ally in his brother, an eccentric inventor named Reed, and she takes refuge in his dilapidated house. However, the people she left behind refuse to stay in the past. While Gabriel haunts Rhine’s memories, Cecily is determined to be at Rhine’s side, even if Linden’s feelings are still caught between them. Meanwhile, Rowan’s growing involvement in an underground resistance compels Rhine to reach him before he does something that cannot be undone. But what she discovers along the way has alarming implications for her future—and on the past her parents never had the chance to explain. In this breathtaking conclusion to Lauren DeStefano’s Chemical Garden trilogy, everything Rhine knows to be true will be irrevocably shattered.